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LaliGallery: About Lali

Lali's Blog:    MyGreenVermont.com


Lali "Her work conveys a sense, not only of technical mastery, but also of aesthetic sensitivity and philosophical profundity. Working mostly on ancient, mythological themes, she produces pieces of timeless, eternal meaning, beauty and interest."

-- Christopher A. Faris,  Manchester (VT) Journal, June 16, 2006

Born in Barcelona, Spain
Ph.D. in Romance Languages
After a career in academia, began painting in 1998 and carving stone in 2003


Shows:
Solo:
  • Annapolis City Hall, Annapolis, Maryland, 2003 (painting and sculpture)
Group:
  • "Art on the Green," Pawlet, VT, 2005



"Let the artist go slowly. Let him give himself up to the work and to time, without counting."
--Jose de Creeft


I sculpt stone with hand tools because they allow me to hear the voice of the stone. I may have in mind something that I want to carve in a certain way, but the stone may have in mind something slightly different. It is important to listen to the stone.

This is also why I carve directly on the stone, without first making clay models or drawings (although I practice drawing as a discipline). I want to establish a dialogue with the stone, a respectful give-and-take, rather than drowning out its voice, or subduing the stone by force.

The time element in hand-carving is significant. It seems right, in this age of instant results, to engage in something that happens so slowly--sometimes, it seems, in geologic time. When I begin work on a sculpture there are days when, at the end of three or four hours of steady carving, I can barely tell that I have made a difference. That is a difficult time for me, requiring strong muscles, blind faith and much humility. But when the figure at last begins to emerge (the "Pygmalion moment") my relationship to it is deeper by virtue of the hours spent working toward that point.

Finally, I carve by hand because I like the rhythm of my arm swinging the mallet, and the sound of the chisel on the stone.

If the pace of stone carving can be described in musical terms as "adagio," the tempo of modeling clay is "allegretto." Clay allows me to bring an idea into form quickly, change it endlessly, take it apart and start over again. My clay figures have a playful, spontaneous feeling--the same feeling I had as a child when I made my first nativity scene out of mud from the backyard. I paint the figures in bright colors and give them a coat of shiny varnish, so that they seem to dance in the light.

For me, stone and clay balance each other--one slow, one fast; one heavy, one light; one serious, the other playful. The alternation between the two both reflects and mediates the equilibrium that I strive for in life.



"The lyfe so short, the craft so long to lerne."
--Chaucer


To buy any available item, contact Lali at

802-497-2858, or e-mail lali@laligallery.com


Home
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Available
Stone Sculpture
Available
Clay Sculpture
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2-D Works
Lali
Retrospective
About
Lali